Marketing Key #3 of 13

Marketing Key #3 – Being viewed as an expert is key

It is important to be viewed as the expert when you are selling a product…but it is imperative when selling a service. Customers are buying a promise from you. And an expert is perceived as someone who is most likely to deliver. Everything you do should scream “We’re experts!” Collateral material, websites, even the way your sales team dresses. You don’t have to say you’re an expert, just use the proper verbiage, images and approach. The customer will get it. With real estate it’s location, location, location…with selling a service its expert, expert, expert.

You will be judged by your email address

I got a letter in the mail the other day from a company that claims to have the ability to lower my property tax. Interesting service if its true. The letter was fairly well written and had a real signature at the bottom. Nice touch.

But here was the problem. As formal and professional as the letter was, the email address for the guy was his first initial, last name and the number 7 at yahoo dot com. He might as well have been lonleygirl15. Its bad enough that he used a Yahoo email address for his business, but to throw a number in there is absolute death to any sort of credibility that he had created.

People will judge you by your email address whether you like it or not. This goes for business or personal use. Here is an overview of your options and what they mean from a business perspective.

1. @companyname.com – Ideal solution. It conveys professionalism, stability and expertise. An example would be jeff@quickaccounting.com

2. @internetservice.com – This means you signed up for a free email account when you got your home Internet service. An example would be quickaccounting@comcast.com. This is an unwise choice for business purposes. It screams “My business is operated out of my home.”

3. @freewebbasedemail.com – This includes Gmail, Yahoo, Hotmail, etc. Gmail will get you the most credibility out of all these, but it is still unwise to use a free web-based email to communicate with your customers. An example would be quickaccounting@gmail.com.

4. @aol.com – Your business already has one foot in the grave if you decide to use this. AOL has not been a legitimate option for email service since the first days of the Internet. Do not use.

Just as a book can be judged by its cover, so will a business be judged by its email address. Spend the extra $10-$20 to purchase a url and the accompanying email addresses. It will be well worth it.

Marketing Key #2 of 13

Marketing Key #2 – Find your customers discomfort and focus on removing it

Whether it be for business or personal needs, most services are purchased to remove a discomfort. IT consultant, house cleaner, doctor, dentist, car rental, gardener, massage, etc. All are services that make life a little easier or a little more pleasant.

Keep this in mind when you are marketing your service. Focus on it. Market to it. You are not simply providing a service, you are making someone’s life more pleasant, less stressful. There is a big difference in how you approach marketing if you look at it this way.

Next up: Key #3 – Being viewed as an expert is key.

BE what interests people

Thought this post by Paul Dunay was spot on.

Don’t try to interrupt people to get them interested in your brand…BE what interests them. Social media in a nutshell.

Marketing Key #1 of 13

Marketing Key #1 – There is no product to touch, taste, try or see.

Its important to remember that a service is different from a product simply because a service is not tangible. Your customer can’t pick it up off the shelf and look it over. They can’t take it for a test drive or try it on. There’s no tasting or smelling it. No borrowing it from a friend to try it out or asking if it comes in a different color.

Services are purchases of trust. They are purchased based on what the customer perceives you will do for them. Because of this, there is a lot more anxiety when it comes to purchasing a service.

Your job is to ease your customers anxiety and ensure them that they are in good hands.

You can do this through referrals or by being extra patient and answering any/all questions that your customer has. Especially if they are new. Always follow through on what you say you will do even if you think the customer may not care. Any action on your part that does damage to the trust can cause a customer to doubt your service.

Next up: Key #2 – Find your customers discomfort and focus on removing it.